Demographic fluctuation of community-acquired antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus lineages: potential role of flimsy antibiotic exposure.

Référence:

ISME J. (Journal of the International Society for Microbial Ecology) 2018 Mar 29. doi: 10.1038/s41396-018-0110-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Auteurs:

Gustave CA1,2, Tristan A1,2, Martins-Simões P1,2, Stegger M3, Benito Y1,2, Andersen PS3,4, Bes M1,2, Le Hir T1,2, Diep BA5, Uhlemann AC6, Glaser P7, Laurent F1,2, Wirth T8,9, Vandenesch F10,11.

Découvrez l’équipe Pathogénie des Staphylocoques dirigée par François Vandenesch

Communiqué de presse:

« Propagation du Staphylocoque doré résistant: la pollution antibotique environnementale en cause? « 

Résumé:

Community-acquired (CA)- as opposed to hospital acquired- methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lineages arose worldwide during the 1990s. To determine which factors, including selective antibiotic pressure, govern the expansion of two major lineages of CA-MRSA, namely « USA300 » in Northern America and « European ST80 » in North Africa, Europe and Middle-East, we explored virulence factor expression, and fitness levels with or without antibiotics. The sampled strains were collected in a temporal window representing various steps of the epidemics, reflecting predicted changes in effective population size as inferred from whole-genome analysis. In addition to slight variations in virulence factor expression and biofilm production that might influence the ecological niches of theses lineages, competitive fitness experiments revealed that the biological cost of resistance to methicillin, fusidic acid and fluoroquinolones is totally reversed in the presence of trace amount of antibiotics. Our results suggest that low-level antibiotics exposure in human and animal environments contributed to the expansion of both European ST80 and USA300 lineages in community settings. This surge was likely driven by antibiotic (ab)use promoting the accumulation of antibiotics as environmental pollutants. The current results provide a novel link between effective population size increase of a pathogen and a selective advantage conferred by antibiotic resistance.

Lien vers l’article dans pubmed.

Affiliations des auteurs:

1 CIRI – Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, Inserm, U1111, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR5308, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Univ Lyon, F-69007, Lyon, France.

2 Centre National de Référence des Staphylocoques, Institut des Agents Infectieux, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.

3 Department for Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.

4 Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

5  Division of HIV, Infectious Diseases, and Global Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

6  Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City, NY, USA.

7  Institut Pasteur – APHP – Université Paris Sud, Unité Ecologie et Evolution de la Résistance aux Antibiotiques Paris, France, CNRS UMR3525, Paris, France.

8  Institut de Systématique, Evolution, Biodiversité (ISYEB – UMR 7205, CNRS, MNHN, UPMC, EPHE), Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Universités, Paris, France.

9  EPHE, PSL University, Paris, France.

10  CIRI – Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, Inserm, U1111, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR5308, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Univ Lyon, F-69007, Lyon, France. francois.vandenesch@univ-lyon1.fr.

11 Centre National de Référence des Staphylocoques, Institut des Agents Infectieux, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France. francois.vandenesch@univ-lyon1.fr.

NOS TUTELLES ET PARTENAIRES