Host-pathogen interaction during lentiviral infection

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General Interests

Primate lentiviruses are a group of closely related viruses that have infected their primate hosts for millions of years. In humans, infection by the human immunodeficiency type 1 and type 2 viruses (known as HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively) leads to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), a wasting disease in which the functionalities of the immune system of the infected person become irreversibly compromised, in the absence of appropriate antiviral regimen.  With more than 35 million people living with HIV/AIDS at this day, the HIV epidemic remains an enormous public health burden in particular in emerging countries and underserved populations.

Our laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms at the basis of HIV replication in its primary cell targets and in elucidating how the virus accommodates with cellular antiviral responses. Toward this goal, our work is focused around the following axes of research:

•    the identification and characterization of cellular proteins that modulate HIV-1 replication
•    the evolutionary and functional study of cellular proteins and of their viral interactants involved in cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses

Using HIV as a starting point, our laboratory has more recently become interested in determining whether specific anti-HIV processes could also be directed, or re-directed, against other viruses. This latest point is developed in close connection with numerous laboratories of the CIRI and aims at translating our knowledge on HIV towards other viruses of interest for public health.

02_Equipe Cimarelli Andrea_webfig1

Funding (in alphabetical order):
amfAR, ANRS, CNRS, FINOVI, FRM, JoRISS, LabEx ECOFECT, Région Auvergne Rhône Alpes, Sidaction

 

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